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the "washington post." exposes detailed much that we did not know before about the reach of america's intelligence agencies into the lives of ordinary non-terrorist, non-suspicious people living in this country. the way u.s. intelligence can and does track our phone calls, our e-mails, virtually all of it all the time. laura poitras and glenn greenwald have done this reporting based on classified documents, who has temporary asylum in russia. it is laura poitras and glenn greenwald who know what their source has to tell. it's they who have been telling his story, making news out of the documents he's given to them week after week now since june. yeah, their source may be in russia now, but they're not.
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and governor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rights, the struggle of the middle class, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. >> announcer: from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television show, this is "meet the press." >> good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous "i have a dream" spe
their government for redress, and to awaken america's long-slumbering conscience. we rightly and best remember dr. king's soaring oratory that day, how he gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, how he offered a salvation path for oppressed and oppressors alike. his words belong to the ages possessing a power and prophesy unmatched in our time. but we would do well to recall that day itself also belonged to those ordinary people whose named never appeared in the history books, never got on tv. many had gone to segregated schools and sat at segregated lunch counters. they lived in towns where they couldn't vote and cities where their votes didn't matter. there were couples in love who couldn't marry, soldiers who fought for freedom abroad that they found denied to them at home. they had seen loved ones beaten and children fire hosed, and they had every reason to lash out in anger or resign themselves to a bitter fate. and yet they chose a different path. in the face of hatred, they prayed for their tormenters. in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in with the moral force of nonv
to work. how would dr. king see the current racial situation in america? >> it took guts to do that then. and it's going to take guts to finish the job now. >> it is the collapse of the traditional family that is wreaking havoc in the african-american community. >> i stand here today in this sacred place in my father's footsteps. >> the other issue is racial profile acvoter identification requirements. while somewhat important are essentially a sideshow, a sideshow. a sideshow. >> stand tall in your community. fight for diversity. understand its strength. >> sideshow. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out. and get in the way! make some noise! >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that the men are made to live together as brothers. >> sideshow. if dr. king were alive today, i believe he would be brokenhearted about what has happened to the traditional famil family. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching "the ed show" right here 5:00 monday through friday. chris matthews is at 7:00. stick around to watch his show. bi
changed america. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prove if i unmatched in our time. >> i have a dream. >> they opened minds. they melted hearts. >> we must keep the faith and keep our eyes on the prize. >> that was the spirit of young people like john lewis brought to that day. >> and america is that promised land for all of us. >> in the face of violence, they stood up and sat in. >> because they kept marching. america changed. >> and yes, eventually the white house changed. >> free at last, free at last. thank god almighty, we are free at last. >> good to have you with us tonight. thanks for watching. i'm ed schultz. "the ed show." we're here monday through friday 5:00 eastern. today was a big day of emotion for this country. a day of record, a day of reflection. to me, you know what, i am so feeling so good about inside is because i think today was a day of learning for a lot of americans. there are a lot of american who's weren't alive 50 years ago today that kind of wondered what this was all about. and the neat thing about it all is that you can't change the f
and major company are celebrating big sales. that's good for america. where is the investment in american workers? we're just going to let an entire city just go off into the dust. because some democrats were in charge of pension plans and fair wages in america. but now it is the big banks. they are now asking the judge for first dibs on the city's tax dollars. residents stage a protest on 48. i don't think they'll give up. but apparently the banks want to fick bones claen before detroit can even get back on its feet. >> we say take it from the banks. the banks destroyed detroit. they trapped detroit into high interest loans. now they're demanding first lien on all tax dollars. we're saying hell no. >> so they want first in. the big banks. your tax dollars went to save the financial sector in this country. will your tax dollars go to float a loan to the people of detroit to rebuild their communities? hell no. big banks are the real parasites of detroit. and the people are the victims in this. union busting is the really parasite. conservative policies which help businesses out for years.
, d.c. to share my thoughts on what i think we need to focus on in public education in america. >> thank you. thank you, joe. >> i am a product of forced busing for racial equality. i take you back to the '70s, where diversity was a word that was foreign to america, but it was the future. i take you to birmingham, alabama, last night, where i did a radio town hall and i can tell you what's happening in america right now. the dream can only be realized if we pay attention to what's going on in our own backyard. when we start picking and choosing neighborhoods, who's going to get the resources and who's not going to get the resources, we will lose this country, we will lose the vision of diversity, we will lose the opportunity of equality to move all people forward. you need to pay attention to what's happening in your backyard to make sure that your school and those young kids get the resources they need to have an opportunity in america that will help them grow. being a product of the middle class, i was the one that was afforded the opportunities. and if we start picking and c
people. also white people, and to know that a nation such as america and the reason that i struggle with it so hard and i grapple with it so hard is because i really believe in the potential of this country. and this country has not realized its potential, it has not even begun to scratch the surface and the humanities. and because i do feel strongly about that potential and because of the kind of inheritance i've had, it was necessary for may to be this. >> and we are very happy to have harry belafonte joining us now on the program today from new york. mr. belafonte, looking back, what do you think about the promise of dr. king's dream, of everything you worked for? what has been achieved? what still need to bes to be ac? >> i do believe that that moment was filled with dreams of over two centuries of expectation that came from the african-american community. and a big part of the american community. we have enjoyed a great journey in achieving the victories that we did. now today i think that we are under a great threat of having those victories reversed. i think there's a new con
at this time 50 years ago today, dr. martin luther king shared his dream for america with america. dr. king was the passionate voice that awakened the conscious of a nation and inspired people all over the world. the power of his words resonated because they were spoken out of an unwavering belief in freedom, injustice, equality, and opportunity for all. let freedom ring was dr. king's closing call for a better and more just america. so today people from all walks of life will gather at 3:00 p.m. for bell-ringing events across our great country and around the world as we reaffirm our commitment to dr. king's ideals. dr. king believed that our destinies are all intertwined, and he knew that our hopes and our dreams are really all the same. he challenged us to see how we all are more alike than we are different. so as the bells of freedom ring today, we're hoping that it's a time for all of us to reflect on not only the progress that has been made, and we've made a lot, but on what we have accomplished and also on the work that still remains before us. it's an opportunity today to recall wher
of an america where all citizens would sit together at the table of brotherhood. >> his words belong to the ages. possessing a power and prophecy unmatched in our time. >> good afternoon. i'm tamron hall. 50 years and nearly two generations and here we stand, a nation reflecting on one of the greatest moments in our history. and a guiding light for our future. the faces of those carrying the torch lit by dr. martin luther king jr. were back today, retraitsing the steps taken by a quarter million americans seeking equality and jobs. it's also today where the first african-american president, arguably the personification of dr. king's dream addressed the crowd in the shadow of greatness. dr. king's speech was incredibly just under 17 minutes long. 1651 words, he was only 34 years old. a speech delivered in a different age at the time carried by just a few networks without the power of the internet or twitter or facebook to help spread that message. it is a speech that the king family closely protects, making sure to preserve the legacy of an iconic leader. now, 50 years later, on this historic ann
and the pursuit of happiness. it's obvious today that america has defaultsed on this promissory note in so far as her citizens of colors are concerned. although black americans had been given a bad check, it had come back marked insufficient funds, he had refused to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity in this nation. he said, we have come to cash this check. we think of that speech and that march as a singular event. and there is in fact nothing like it in our history. but it is less of a pillar and more like a peak, it is a summit that was reached. it was a moment in an ongoing movement that was well underway and not nearly over by the time that happened. and that march, and that speech like the campaign to desegregate the northwood theater in baltimore, and those protests with the terrifying consequences in america's georgia, that march was a tactic dreamed up in realtime by real imperfect people working together as a body in motion making incremental decisions about what to do next. about what might work. when we come back, we will be joined by the m
've heard this kind of talk before. but america is a different country. voters are rejecting 40 years of gop scare tactics. voters are supporting the obama administration's move to end severe mandatory sentences for low-level nonviolent drug offenders. of course, over at fox, they don't get it. >> they're not pot smokers. they're not pill poppers. >> wait a second. 50%. but the thing, what if the kid has a drug problem? >> then you get the kid to rehab or lock him in the basement or do what you have to do. that's what parents do. >> who thinks that one of these elderly people who have been in prison for a mandatory minimum sentence, that they're going to get out and they're not going to be on public assistance? of course they are. >> so we should keep people in prison to keep them off public aid? we should just lock up people with drug problems. this kind of demonizing and fearmongering is really nothing new for the right. it goes all the way back to president richard nixon. >> america's public enemy number one in the united states is drug abuse. in order to fight and defeat this enemy, it i
our talented military spouses. after everything you've done for america, every american ought to be doing something to support your families. as this time of war ends, some of you will be taking off the uniform and returning to civilian life. and just as we gave you the tools to succeed on the battlefield, i want to make sure we're giving you the tools to succeed in the next stage of your lives as well. so we've improved transition assistance to help you find the job that's worthy of your skills. we're helping you and your families pursue your education under the post-9/11 g.i. bill and making sure instead of off, schools that give you the education you paid for are being held accountable. we're making sure more states and more industries are recognizing your military skills with licenses and credentials you need for a civilian job. when i first came into office, i was meeting medics who had been treating folks on the battlefield and when they went back to school because they wanted to be a nurse, they had to start all over again at nursing 101. and here they are, dealing with
, and are responsible, here in america, you can make it if you try. >>> even as this pecks increasingly crucial to get into the middle class, the cost of a college education is going further and further out of reach. with the average student borrower graduating more than $26,000 in dead. at the university of buffalo today, the president said that has to change. >> higher education is still the best ticket to upward mobility. if we don't do something about keeping it within reach, it will create problems for economic mobility for generations to come. that's not acceptable. >>> to help make that change hahn happen, the president is propose a plan to tie federal aid to the schools offering, using a variety of metrics to reward the schools helping students from all -- if enacted it would be the biggest change since 1965. but as the president noted, that could be a big if. >> we've seen a faction of republicans in congress that suggest that maybe america shouldn't pay its bills that have already been run up, that we should shut down government if they can't shut down obamacare. we can't afford in washingto
to what is. >>> the following limited commercial presentation is made possible by bank of america. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about
. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song. >> i don't know about you, b bbu but -- ♪ i woke up with my mind stayed on freedom ♪ >> and even celebrities joined in echoing dr. king's words. >> and as the bells toll today at 3:00, let us ask ourselves how will the dream live on in me and you and all of us? >> and those bells did toll. on the national mall and all over the country, they rang to commemorate dr. king's call to let freedom ring. and then on the very same steps from which dr. king addressed the country decades earlier, president obama brought the point of today home. today is not just about commemorating the dream, but advancing it. because t
the one, fighting to be a part of america, and you see fearlessness in almost every state if you look. >> you were inspired because of what happened with trayvon martin? is that one of the reasons that somebody from their generation has become -- he was mentioned three our fortimes in different speeches, excluding by dr. king's sister. >> it was an alarm cloic for a lot of young people. then for the verdict to not go the way we had expected or plan i think set off a lot of young even. all i have to do is look around, but i do think that having someone that was our generation that looked just like us taken out of, you have the case of israel hernandez in miami, an artist just graffiti'ing an abandoned mcdonald's taken out. young people are starting to observe that hey, possibly the america we have today isn't the one we want tomorrow. >> interesting in 1963, obviously it was a lot of young people that came out that was the 8th anniversary of emmett till's slaying, but i have to play you this. at the end of the '63 march, they listed ten demands of things that they thought were importan
. >> america cannot determine the future of egypt. that's a task for the egyptian people. we don't take sides with any particular party or political figure. i know it's tempting inside of egypt to blame the united states or the west or some other outside actor for what's gone wrong. we've been blamed by supporters of morsi, we've been blamed by the other side as if we are supporters of morsi. that kind of approach will do nothing to help egyptians achieve the future that they deserve. >> reporter: and, thomas, while we are waiting for reaction to come in, i suspect part of what you'll hear are some lawmakers making the point this doesn't go far enough. we know senator john mccain has been consistently calling on the united states to pull back and to end the $1.3 billion in military aid that it sends to egypt every year. there are some democrats that have gotten on board with that as well. representative keith ellieson making that same point yesterday. bipartisan calls for the united states to take a much tougher stance of president obama continuing to get updated on the situation in egypt whi
. >>> later, made in america, a label that's been disappearing lately, but a new movie is highlighting companies that are keeping jobs right here in the united states. i'll talk with the film's director. >>> about next i'm taking your questions on "ask ed live" my favorite segment coming up. i think farmers care more about the land than probably anyone else. we've had this farm for 30 years. we raise black and red angus cattle. we also produce natural gas. that's how we make our living and that's how we can pass the land and water back to future generations. people should make up their own mind what's best for them. all i can say is it has worked well for us. she loves a lot of it's what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditi
address. >> racism in america. for it to be so blat abbott. >> that's right. jay-z, america is blatantly racist. that's why you're a multimillionaire. >> policy wise, zilch, zero, nada. >> i don't want to go through the same old arguments where i propose an idea and the republicans say no because it is my idea. 40 meaningless votes to repeal obamacare is not a jobs plan. >> who do you want to die in america with breast cancer? >> it is an aimless congress. >> the country is hanging by a thread here. >> we begin with a look at the ongoing right wing vitriol that has been spewed in what should be an opportunity for a sincere conversation about racism in america. the three top agents of intolerance, bill o'reilly, sean hannity and rush limbaugh continue to oopinion about the virtues. offering insulting diagnoses from crime to teen pregnancy to race. o'reilly went so far to say jay-z' wealth is evidence that america is post racial. he even took it upon himself to explain black culture to the naacp's senior vice president. we here thought their rhetoric should be called out for what it really
america with these republican congressmen going home saying obamacare is bad for america. it simply is not. it is fantastic. i would make the case that obamacare, along with civil rights legislation, that we passed back in the '60s, is the most moral thing this country has ever done when it comes to a collective government body. this is good for america. and i won't let them lie. they're phony christians. phony christians when they say that they are christian but then they want to take away from their next door neighbor. they don't want to be their brother's keeper. here's the bottom line. i'm still waiting for this evangelical pastor to show up on the "ed show" and tell us is this christian like behavior to take away health care from a fellow american? from a fellow citizen? from a person of god? is that what we're all about as a country? where is our moral fiber? a growing number of right wing christians are coming out day after day as a christian, i think i have the right to expose their hypocrisy and call them out for all the thing they are saying wrong and how misguided they are. >> m
is author of "the king years" and center of women, politics and public policy and author of "moving america towards justice." taylor, you're a great historian. first let's do this. the president spoke on the 50th anniversary of the march on washington and the famous "i have a dream" speech. he paid tribute to the men and women in the front lines only a few of whom such as john lewis are with us today. let's watch the president. >> because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed and yes, eventually the white house changed. because they marched america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans but for women and latinos, asians and native americans, for catholics, jews, and muslims, for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. >> have conservatived in america judged this man by the content of his character? >> absolutely not. conservatives in america talk about conservative politics and use the
in america. that there is going to be a template by conservative elected leaders, governors, mayors, when it comes the dealing with obligations, and of course, the running they'll is, well, it is the workers' fault. this man right here go he is the first one to take the bait. that is the mayor of the richest city in america. he says that saving, saying public workers, their pensions, public workers' pensions, could put new york in the same boat as detroit? isn't that a little extreme? come on. this week new york city mayor michael bloomberg gave a speech blaming special interests politics for detroit's collapse. >> the forces that can stop the city can be internal. not just external. short sightedness, corruption, mismanage many, and perhaps most dangerous of all, special interest politics. of course, over the course of several did he go aids, we saw all of those factors at work in detroit. >> what we're seeing here is a comparison. as i said in previous programs, you are going to see mayors across the country use detroit as the example. see what they did wrong. we can't have that happen
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
in america that wants to take health care away from the poorest americans. they want to allow them to get sick and do nothing about it. and then just let them fall by the wayside. is that christian? is that what the lord did when he was on the face of the earth? now, there's many religions in our country, but the christian faith is one that is supposed to take care of its brother, to believe that the only way to heaven is through the father, and to help your neighbor and to help the sick and the poor. i don't know about you, folks, i'm sick and tired of these born-again christians preaching down on the rest of us as if they are the holy grail and the road to heaven because they have all the answers? it's all for what? to hurt people. if we repeal obamacare, if this were to go through, it would hurt americans. there's nothing christian about that. i would like an evangelical christian pastor to come on this program and explain to me where i'm wrong. the majority of americans want obamacare. we voted on it twice. we put the same guy in office who brought us obamacare. but there is this radi
in pregnancy are very low. >> how did america get so mediocre? >> i think parents- both parents started working. and the mom is in the workplace. >> for everyone who is a valedictorian, there is another 100 out there that they weigh 130 pounds and they've got cavs the size of cantaloupes because they're hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert. >> i have no idea. >> even at this point? >> well, i don't know. was there a birth certificate? you tell me. some people tell me that was not his birth certificate. i'm saying i don't know. >> so with all of this autopsy, joy, with all of this, we need to reach out, expand the tent. we need to really make a new party. these are the kind of things that they have representing their party. to the core, they can't change it. >> exactly. and what you just showed there, that was the core demographic of the republican party now. it is a generation of almost entirely men, almost entirely white there are women in it as well, who come from a generation where they resent the changes that took place in the 20th century. they resent things like bussing. they
learning when you look at the number of tech schools. just the sheer number. is that the case in america when you look at us compared to other industrialized countries? >> that debate goes on a lot. there's something sort of aspirational about the idea of college, about the fulfillment of the american dream. especially when you talk about, you know, parents or grandparents who didn't go to college who didn't have the opportunity. the pride they take in being able to watch their kids and grand kids be eligible for it, be able to do it. and you're right, i don't think that's something that the president's going to bring up today. the other thing here too, i think, sure, there's the issue here, has to go through republicans in congress, who knows if that's going to happen. but it's a step more removed from that. this is a philosophical moment for the president. republicans are out there in the town halls back in the districts, what are we hearing from that? a shutdown, debt ceiling fight, we want to get rid of obama care and this is obama saying while they're having that conferring, this is
can't be discouraged by what is, we've got to keep pushing for what ought to be. the america we ought to leave to our children, mindful that the hardships we face are nothing compared to those dr. king and his fellow marchers faced 50 years ago and that if we maintain our faith in ourselves and in the possibilities of this nation, there is no challenge we cannot surmount. >> joining me today, distinguished senior fellow, bob herbert, contributing editor for "rolling stone" and visiting scholar at nyu, eric bates. and congressional reporter, sahil kapur. joining me from washington is nbc justice correspondent pete williams. pete, you talked recently about the march on washington. why don't you tell us about that. >> reporter: washington, d.c., in the summer of 1963 was more than a little nervous about the prospect of a big civil rights march coming to the city, and that worry extended from the president on down, a fear that if it went badly, it could derail the efforts to pass the nation's most important civil rights law. ♪ it's easy to see now why the march on washington is celebrat
in america. it's increasingly in the suburbs. if you look at polls out recently, four out of five of adults in this country will in this country at some point struggle with poverty, possibly have to accept food stamps. so this -- i think sometimes some people sort of focus on this old idea of poverty that it's in certain areas, in the inner city. i think we have ronald reagan in many ways to thank for that consistent image about poverty and about people who are poor and taking advantage of the system. it's just not true. poverty is much more widespread. it crosses much more demographics racially than it has in many, many years. and it's very sad. i think you're going to see somebody like cory booker who looks like he will be the negotiation senator from new jersey, he is somebody who wants to come in and really talk about the poverty. the democratic party i think for many years have not wanted to talk about poverty. and it looks like along with folks like karen bass and cory booker, they're going to have these champions to talk about poverty. >> well, you know, i've been around the country,
states, and i think the public in large measure has come to the conclusion that america can't want these kinds of changes more than the countries themselves want it for themselves. and the difficulty of how much the united states tries to put its thumb on the scale has played out in afghanistan, and played out in iraq and it is now being tested in egypt. so, that's why i'm eagerly anticipating the president's remarks for the larger signals that it sends about the kind of leverage he intendeds to use and how much time he intends to dedicate to this particular issue which is not just -- remember, this is not just about the future of egypt. egypt, unlike other country, i think it's tom friedman and others say what happens in egypt doesn't stay in egypt. it's important for the region. important for israel and really important for the future of u.s. foreign policy. >> it's something i've always looked to as a trend-setter in the arab role. i want to bring in benjamin goldbe goldberger, times national editor. i want to start with you. this is a much larger question for that entire region
do. there is this assumption that it's america's responsibility to make things better within egypt, within syria, i wish we could. i wish we could bring democracy together. it's a great mistake to think we have the power to do it, and instead we waste enormous amounts of money even trying. and also, there was movement on one issue, as rachel noted. immigration and that's because john mccain can count. every reasonable republican understands if they don't move on immigration, it's a political disaster. unfortunately, reasonable republicans are not anywhere near a majority in the house. >> let me ask you about that, it does feel to me like, i love that part of what the president is doing here is saying, you got an answer to this, go ahead and try. it also seems that the president's real challenge has been with these house republicans who won't even get in line with their own party leadership. does working with an elder like senator mccain make any difference in that kind of environment? >> unfortunately, probably not. by the way, we did get the confirmation tonight. and i think that'
and syria, america has to take a much more clever role. >> we'll get the latest from the white house. but that is not the only pressure on the president. >> i think now is the single best time to stop obama care. >> stop talking about impeachment. let's have a legitimate debate. let's fight his policies. let's try to appeal obama care. >> gop leaders are split on the push for impeachment as the opposition to defund obama care continues in earnest. >>> and later -- >> if a church is off limits, if the sanctuary of god is not off limits, if people are so malice and mean-spirited, what has become of our nation. >> retracing the steps of the civil rights movement, and confronting some of the ghosts which still haunt the city of birmingham today. we'll get to those stories in just a moment. >>> we start, though, with that developing news in syria at this hour. new information from washington, and the international community. allegations about the chemical weapons attack by the assad regime. i'm joined by nbc's ayman mohieldin. and kirsten at the white house. >> reporter: they've reached a
and complacency. murders from urban america to suburban america. the pursuit of power for power's sake. we stand here today to say it is time to wake up. so here in 2013 we stand before the statue of the great emancipator. we look towards the statue of the great liberator. we say we have come to wake up a new civil rights movement. for economic justice. a new civil rights movement for freedom in these days. a new civil rights movement for jobs. a new civil rights movement for men, for women, for children of all background, all races, all dispositions, all orientations, all cities, all counties, all towns, all across america. america it is time to wake up. >> from the naacp, pamela, a new civil rights movement that's something that has to be started at the grassroots level as well. >> there's no question. i nene beauty and magnify sense of the civil rights movement 50 years ago was part of the coalition movement. he understood the issues that real estate late, women issues, gay rights issues, disparity on race, economic issues. bringing alligator of those folks together understanding that it is e
, of course, britain is america's biggest ally, so it's hard toss the u.s. would take an action without britain. also there's mounting pressure from members of congress. house speak john boehner sending a her to the president saying what do you want to accomplish with military action? so the momentum seems to have slowed, with the discussion behind the scene focusing on what would the legal justification be. >> we want to move on to richard engel. he's in ankara turkey. so what is the next move if the u.s. is to strike? so what is the next move if this does go forward? >> well, it really depends on if it goes forward and what exactly happens. the red cross today said it doesn't support an escalation that will only make a horrible humanitarian situation even worse. turkey absolutely wants military action to be taken against bashar al assad. he's making states like where is the world's humanity? how can they war crimes go unpunished? but his voice is not one we're hearing in unanimity. egypt has set it doesn't support, the arab league says it's not for military action. the u.n. wants to c
over steroid use. is it enough to restore trust in america's favorite pastime? perspective this morning as i talk with bob costas of nbc sportses. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday morning, august 4th. >> and good sunday morning. the u.s. is on high alert at this hour. 22 u.s. embassies from north africa to bangladesh are closed now, and a worldwide travel alert is in effect for americans. andrea mitchell is nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent. andrea, good to have you here. what is it about where this is coming from and the significance of it that has engendered such a big reaction? >> well, they have intercepted chatter and it's coming from and targeting yemen. they believe it's either emanating from yemen where al qaeda and the arabian peninsula is the strongest unit or fractional unit of al qaeda that still remains. it's also the most operational unit. they're concerned about this area, but now they're looking at other areas as well. if there is no attack today, because this is the holiest day of the month of ramadan, the holy period in the musl
secretary kerry to cairo. >> america cannot determine the future of egypt. that's a task for egyptian people ♪ there must be some kind of way out of here said the joker to the thief ♪ ♪ there's too much confusion >> good afternoon. we begin as the death toll from egypt's bloody crackdown continues to rise well into the hundreds now. as the extent of the military's assault on protesters comes into focus and the u.s. gauges its response to the bloodshed. at this hour, health officials report more than 600 dead and some 3,700 injured. figures that are yet expected to rise in the worst day of civil violence in the nation's modern history. but despite the brutal toll, muslim brotherhood supporters have ousted president morsi, urged demonstrators to take to the streets once more, vowing to bring down the interim government with mass protests today in cairo and to the north in alexandria. government buildings were set on fire in the city of guiza across the nile river from cairo. even if the interim government vowed to confront, quote, terrorist acts and officially authorize the use of live f
stands for every servant that serves america. the butler is you, you're serving america. the butler is me, i'm serving america through my cinema. and he happens to be looked down on. that's how we look at -- how we look at class, how we address class in america. which transcends race too. >> and you'll see martin bashir's full interview with lee daniels director of the butler" coming up in a few minutes. next the day's top lines. look who has a new appreciation for the performing arts. >> this is an artist. a very brave artist, believe it or not, rodeo clowns. they could he get mauled by a bull at any time. this is art, this is entertainment. a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar mayer. [ male
elected. i wanted to do health care. >> here in america, in the wealthiest nation on earth, no illness or accident should lead to any family's financial ruin. >> you need to pay attention to what's happening in your backyard. >> defund obama care. >> defund obama care sue repeal obama care. ♪ ♪ i want it now, i want it all >> i wanted to do health care because i knew it could change the country and i knew it could help people. >> we see this coming. just like the tie tannic. >> on the ship we're going to die. >> are you saying that society should let him die? >> no. >> there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. all right? there are 47% who are with him who are -- who believe that they are victims. >> that's who the republicans are. we shouldn't be talking about infrastructure investment, investment in education, investment in workers and going round two on health care. >> i want to repeal the law of the land. is that clear. >> we will not back down from that fight. >> i've been very proud to do that. ♪ >> let's go. let's hit the road. >> good to h
, america, wake up. we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way. make some noise! >> much grief as we give congress, it's amazing that it is john lewis is still a member of the institution. lonny bunch founder of the national museum of african-american history and culture which will be completed in 2015 on the national mall in washington. pulitzer prize winning taylor branch, the author of the landmark history of the civil rights movement, america in the king years. his most recent book, the king years, is now available in paperback and i assume download as well. we say paperback. in these days, can you get it on the download itself. let me start with you, you're in the middle of trying to build a museum appropriate for the african-american legacy, the importance of the march on washington. an entire wing? how important is it in the legacy as you're building this? >> the march on washington is one of the key moments in african-american history, in american history. so our go
to america's calculus vis-a-vis syria right now? >> i mean, let me be blunt. if the united states decides to strike against syria, this would be an american operation. america would take ownership of this particular operation. american operation without a u.n. security council resolution, a u.s. operation without the final report by the u.n. inspectors, a u.s. operation without a broadly based coalition. france said it would join the united states. turkey and saudi arabia and qatar. but they have been the spearhead of the fight against the assad regime. thus, the united states would be joining the anti-assad regime. the reality is regardless of how you -- we try to really explain the american operation, few in the region -- and i'm talking about the middle east and the muslim world -- would see this operation as an american operation. regardless of how important the u.s. evidence is, and it's very powerful evidence against the assad regime, the consequences, i think, would be very pivotal, both for the region and i think for america's interests in that part of the world. >> professor, yes
in oprahhoma. >> we are trying to ignite that love affair that america has with america'sfounding. >> the founding fathers of america sure had -- >> reshape the united states into a progressive liberal utopia. >> for you and for me. everybody. equality, peace. >> oh, no, let's go. let's go crazy. >> let's get done. >> good to have you with us tonight, folks. have you ever been in a conversation with a conservative who comes back in any argument you may be having and says, you know what? there are absolutes. tonight's ed show is about absolutes. absolutely change taking place right here in the middle of the country surrounded by red states. tonight i'm broadcasting from minneapolis, minnesota, in the middle of the country where democrats have taken control of the house, senate and governor's office. you know, in the past year we have seen three things, fiscal change, social change and something that we never see anything under republican rule, and that's reinvestment in public education. this state is proof positive when the democrats get control, things change for the be
to a broad swath of america. dr. king's speech was a pointed speech, but a healing speech. dr. king's speech was an important speech, because it charted a vision. i think for the president, and for all of us that are going to participate in after the the activities, we call it a continuation, not just a commemorative series of events, for all of us and for the president i think especially it is about the future. it's about 21st century america, but it's also about a recognition of what i call sinister forces, martin, that are at play in this nation, the discussion about repealing health care, the voter suppression laws that exist, all of this in the face of a great recession in the aftermath of a great recession, when what the nation should really be about is building the kind of bridges we need to build economic prosperity for all. it's important, but it also is a chance action i think, for the president to think beyond his administration, and think beyond his term as president, to set a course which may last for decades to come. >> professor peterson, mark moriel talks about the future, bu
into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we will bring you the live coverage of the events here on the mall throughout the day, right here on msnbc. and as we get things started this hour, i am thrilled to be joined this morning by joy reid, msnbc contributor and managing editor of thegrio.com. she also leads nerdland whenever i'm on vacation. also, julian vaughn, naacp chairman emeritus. and next to him, the reverend william barber, head of the north carolina chapter of the naacp and leader of one of today's most important social movements for justice, the moral mondays protes
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